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Alltech's Director of Worldwide Research Named 2008 Industry Fellow by the American Society of Animal Science

[Lexington, KY] - Dr. Karl Dawson, director of worldwide research at Alltech, was named a 2008 Fellow of the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) in the industry category. Dawson was honored on July 8, in Indianapolis, Indiana, during the ASAS Awards Ceremony at the society's annual meeting.

"This award comes as no surprise to us," said Dr. Pearse Lyons, president and founder of Alltech. "Dr. Dawson is an internationally recognized scientist who has made very significant contributions to the understanding of microbial processes in the rumen. His pioneering work with yeast supplements has challenged the traditional concepts and practices of ruminant nutrition. It is a true honor to have him on our team."

According to ASAS, this prestigious award recognizes distinguished service to the animal science and livestock industry over a long period of time. The award requires a minimum of twenty-five years membership in the Society. Dawson was nominated for this year's award by Dr. Gary Cromwell, professor of swine nutrition and coordinator of the swine section at the University of Kentucky.

As Alltech's director of worldwide research, Dawson coordinates research activities for Alltech's three bioscience centers in Ireland, the United States, and Thailand. Prior to joining Alltech, Dawson was a professor of nutritional microbiology and served as the director of the nutritional microbiology laboratory at the University of Kentucky. He worked at the University of Kentucky for 21 years and established a research program there in 1971.

A productive and enthusiastic scientist, Dawson has authored 80 peer-reviewed articles, 25 book chapters, and 164 abstracts. He has been at the forefront of examining the effect of feed additives on rumen fermentations. Through his careful application of microbiological and biochemical principles, he found that yeast cultures enhance beneficial ruminal microbial activities. This work is the basis for much of the current usage of probiotic additives.

Dawson holds a Bachelor of Science in Bacteriology from Utah State University, a Master of Science in Microbiology from the University of Wyoming, and a Ph.D. in Bacteriology from Iowa State University. His research has focused on strategies for improving animal health and performance by altering microbial activities in the gastrointestinal tract.

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