Jun 29

Is Jersey Cow Production The Future?

Categories: Dairy Cows
Is Jersey Cow Production The Future?
Prof. Judith L. Capper has spent the last 5 years researching the environmental impact of dairy systems and how this can help us as we try to grow more food with less land for the estimated 9.3 billion people in 2050. Capper’s research discovered that jersey cows don’t produce as much milk as Holsteins but they do produce more cheese. So is jersey cow production the future?

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Jun 25

Profiting Despite Volatile Dairy Prices

Profiting Despite Volatile Dairy Prices Mikhail Ramanovich Live Scribe

In recent years, milk prices have fluctuated greatly.  At Alltech’s recent Symposium, IFCN’s Mikhail Ramanovich discussed why some dairy producers have succeeded during this time, while others have not.  According to Ramanovich, profitability comes from good management.

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Jun 21

Minimizing Methane - Greenhouse Gas Reduction for Dairy

Categories: Dairy Cows
Minimizing Methane - Greenhouse Gas Reduction for Dairy Dr. Tim McAllister - Minimizing Methane - Greenhouse Gas Reduction for Dairy
“Lots of scientists are working on this but it’s not easy,” said Dr. Tim McAllister, referring to research into the reduction of methane production from dairy cows. Greenhouse gas emissions are a major concern for the dairy industry as it strives for sustainability and methane is a much more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Reducing the production of methane would go a long way toward meeting emissions targets.

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Jun 21

Phosphorus Excretion in Dairy Cows

Categories: Dairy Cows
Phosphorus Excretion in Dairy Cows Professor Ermias Kebreab, UC Davis, California, USA

Professor Ermias Kebreab, UC Davis, California, USA - Dairy Solutions Symposium

Professor Ermias Kebreab, UC Davis, California, USA - Dairy Solutions Symposium

An essential nutrient, a finite resource, an environmental contaminant

“Over 60% of the phosphorus that is consumed by dairy cows is excreted,“ said Professor Ermias Kebreab. This is a serious problem that must be addressed as soon as possible. Inorganic phosphorus is mined for use in fertilizer, mineral supplements and industrial uses and it is a finite resource. Kebreab said, “In the next 50 to 100 years it is estimated that we won’t have any more inorganic phosphorus.”

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