North America



Feedlot nutrition: Provide a smooth transition

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – When transitioning cattle from ranch to rail, feed intake of a nutrient-dense diet is of utmost importance. Research indicates only 20 percent of cattle will eat on the day of arrival to the feedyard and by day five, only two-thirds are eating a sufficient ration from the bunk.

“Shipping stress, the health and nutritional status of the calf, unfamiliar surroundings and foreign feedstuffs are all factors that can take away a new feeder’s appetite. Subsequent poor intake during the starting phase can and will lead to morbidity and poor performance in the feedyard,” said Dr. Vaughn Holder, Alltech beef specialist.

According to Holder, there are many factors to focus on when starting cattle on feed, such as the cattle themselves, the feedstuffs utilized in the ration and the facilities in which cattle are placed. It is also imperative to know as much about the history of the cattle as possible. Records should include the health status of the calf (vaccinations, implants, etc.), origin, nutrient status of the herd and whether a preconditioning program was used.

Once placed in the feedyard, Holder suggests providing dry feedstuffs, such as long hay, to encourage calves to come to the bunk and eat. 

“The ration can be transitioned gradually to allow for the use of unfamiliar feedstuffs as calves become acclimated to their new environment,” Holder said. “Dry matter intake expectations will vary depending on the ingredient content of the ration and quality of the forage supply.”

Alltech recently launched a new additive specifically designed for transitioning cattle to feedlot rations. A solution from the Alltech Gut Health Management program, Select TC promotes good bacteria and builds natural defenses. The technology also supports the efficient transfer of nutrients and can be used to reduce risk and improve herd safety.

One of the services included with the Gut Health Management program is Alltech’s 37+®, the most advanced mycotoxin analysis available, which detects up to 38 different mycotoxins at ppb and ppt levels. The 37+ program’s feed analysis and risk assessment is also coupled with an on-site audit evaluating feed storage, and operational logistics based on HAACP principles, providing the herd manager with access to a powerful tool to deal proactively rather than reactively with the health and productivity of the operation.

“Many times on the feedlot it is not an acute case that can be readily identified, but a chronic situation associated with the ingestion of a low level of mycotoxins over an extended period of time,” Holder said. “This results in a wide array of subclinical symptoms that slowly reduce performance, eat away at the producer’s bottom line and compromise animal health.”

For more information about Select TC and 37+, please contact your local Alltech representative.

Spring calving: Prepare today for tomorrow’s new addition

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – When warmer temperatures set in and winter starts to melt away, cattle producers across the country will be keeping one eye on the pasture and one eye on their next biggest investment—their calves.

According to Vaughn Holder, Alltech beef specialist, developing a spring calving program does not have to be complicated, just compatible with the herd. Holder suggests the following management practices for a successful spring calving season:

  • Pay attention to the cleanliness of dry lots, holding areas, calving facilities and feeding areas. Minimize the accumulation of drainage water mixing with dry manure, which creates a haven for bacterial growth.
  • In intensively managed calving environments, minimize the sterile newborn calf’s exposure to pathogens by disinfecting the navel, assuring cow’s teats are clean and free of manure and maintaining a clean and dry environment for calf and mother.
  • Plastic sleeves should be used when assisting with calving. Watch cows after calving for retained placentas and treat all uterine, vaginal and udder infections according to the veterinarian’s recommendations.
  • To keep records current, cows need to be individually identified. Producers should also tag and record all calving information at birth.
  • Maintain a sound nutrition program. Even during times of economic instability, producers should not skimp on providing proper nutrition to their herds.

Proper nutrition can impact the success of any breeding program and several trace elements such as copper, zinc, manganese and selenium are known to impact reproduction directly.  Since most cattle producing regions are usually deficient in one or more of these essential trace elements, it is important to not only supplement the dam with a good mineral but the offspring as well. 

“Losing several cows due to inadequate feed will cost the producer more than keeping their diet balanced with the proper vitamins, minerals and quality forages,” Holder said. “Good nutrition can keep the herd’s resistance high to disease challenges. It’s always a sound investment.”

Holder said, when choosing a mineral it is always important to distinguish between inorganic (sulfates and oxides) and organic sources of minerals. Organic trace minerals (such as proteinates) are absorbed differently, enabling the animal to utilize and store these forms of minerals better. When supplying animals only with inorganic forms of copper, zinc, and manganese, poor adsorption can happen and deficiency symptoms can appear.  Besides poor availability, inorganic minerals are also subjected to mineral antagonists (such as high iron, sulfur and molybdenum) and can be another reason for poor trace mineral status of the beef herd.

With new environmental feeding regulations being put in place each year, Alltech’s Mineral Management program strives to provide a secure source of organic trace minerals that are contaminant-free and safe for the environment. Recent field research shows that producers can feed substantially lower amounts of organic trace minerals than the inorganic alternative and get a similar, if not better, performance in cattle.

“Research has shown that cattle excrete a tremendous amount of trace mineral on a daily basis, and this can have a negative impact on the denitrification process, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions,” Holder said. “Feeding a beef cow exactly what it needs with organic trace minerals, will result in enhanced efficiency and less mineral excretion.”

Alltech’s Mineral Management program will be further discussed during Beef: Its Future at the Alltech REBELation May 17-20 in Lexington, Kentucky, USA.

Kentucky Rye Barrel IPA seasonal and limited edition single barrel Town Branch® Bourbon flow into market

Kentucky Rye Barrel IPA

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – While snow, ice or blistery cold is blanketing much of the country, images of warmer days may be conjured up now thanks to a new spring seasonal brew that pours into the market this week. Hoppy, spicy and crisp, Kentucky Rye Barrel IPA is a new, limited edition seasonal beer from Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. that is aged for six weeks in Town Branch® Rye whiskey barrels, as well as Kentucky bourbon barrels.

The unique rye India pale ale is brewed with rye grain and dry-hopped in the barrel and boasts a citrusy character in the nose and finish, as well as soft notes of vanilla and woody ribbons of oak and rye from the barrel. Alltech Lexington Brewing and Distilling Company’s barrel-aged seasonal program allows the brewery to step outside of its year-round offerings to experiment with new tastes, furthering its reputation as barrel-aging experts.

“Distillers discovered rye decades ago and embraced it for its spicy, complex character,” said Ken Lee, master brewer for Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. “Today, more brewers have also embraced rye thanks to the complex notes it can add. With the spice from our Town Branch Rye barrels and the unique dry hopping we did in the barrel, I think craft beer fans will love this crisp seasonal beer.”

Kentucky Rye Barrel IPA hits store shelves this week in Kentucky, and will reach select markets in the company’s domestic distribution area soon. At 10 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), the limited seasonal release has a suggested retail price of $14.99 for a four-pack.

Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co has also launched a limited Town Branch® Bourbon Single Barrel to be sold exclusively at its Visitor Center in downtown Lexington. Master distiller Mark Coffman recently hand-selected two barrels of the company’s bourbon that had “strong vanilla and floral notes, and almost candy-like toffee notes” for the first run of the single barrel program.

Yielding roughly 150 bottles from each barrel, both single barrel versions boast cask-strength proofs, hovering close to 125 proof. The collectible bottles have a suggested retail price of $69.99 and are on sale now exclusively at the Town Branch Distillery Visitor Center at 401 Cross Street in Lexington, Ky. All include the master distiller’s signature, as well as the bottle number and selection date.

Please follow the Kentucky Ale Facebook page or the Kentucky Ale Twitter for updates on Kentucky Rye Barrel IPA availability across the region as shipments are made.   

Alltech IPPE breakfast: Feed flock today to benefit human health tomorrow

Registered dietitian and human nutritionist Nikki Putnam encouraged poultry industry members to keep the consumers’ health and wellness in mind when selling and marketing meat and eggs during her presentation at Alltech’s Annual Breakfast Meeting during IPPE.

[ATLANTA] – What if you could produce high quality, safe and delicious eggs and meat that also happen to be nutrient powerhouses for consumers?  What if your premium eggs and meat tasted better than your competitors? What if your eggs and meat could assist in the learning ability of children, reduce cardiovascular disease and slow age-related mental decline?

Registered dietitian and human nutritionist, Nikki Putnam, posed these questions and more during Alltech’s annual breakfast at the International Production and Processing Expo (IPPE) on Wednesday, Jan. 28. Putnam spoke to more than 200 members of the poultry industry on opportunities to attain profitable growth while meeting a demanding consumer market through algae nutrition during her presentation, “What if a Nutrient Derived From The Sea Could Improve Both Animal and Human Health?”  

Putnam, whose chief role with Alltech is to close the gap between human nutrition and animal production, asked the audience to consider if they know what their consumers want? A 2013 study by Sullivan Higdon & Sink Advertising and Marketing Agency found that 69 percent of consumers think it’s important to understand how their food is produced.

“The health and wellness industry has exploded in the past five years, and continues to grow exponentially each year,” Putnam said. “Consumers are smart. They’ve learned to read labels. They’re learning to be skeptical of claims on packaging, and they’ve learned how to find anything they’d like to know about a food product, fad diet or disease online.”

One way producers can reach the consumer market is through functional foods. By enriching the animal’s diet with additional nutrients, such as DHA omega-3, naturally more nutrient-dense food products like meat, milk and eggs are created, without any off flavors, added ingredients or change in the quality or consistency of the food.

In addition to studies showing an improvement in birds’ immune health and bone strength, the active forms of essential omega fatty-acids, particularly DHA, in human diets play an important role during pregnancy and early infant development. High levels of dietary DHA are also associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease, age-related mental decline and attention deficit disorder.

However, Putnam said the typical human dietary intake of DHA is falling short of the recommended 400 to 1,000 mg/d rate due to a worldwide fish and fish oil shortage and the potential for contaminants to enter in traditional autotrophic algae production. A renewable alternative to fish oil, heterotrophic algae is grown in an enclosed system and does not use sunlight so specific nutrients can be fed and intake can be controlled. 

“Is food the new medicine? Why are we so DHA focused?” Putnam said. “Consumers at the supermarket are looking at price, nutrients, sustainability... but it all boils down to health. They are looking for the healthier option.”

In addition to the breakfast meeting and in keeping with Alltech’s focus on education, the Alltech Student Manuscript Award was presented to Kathryn Meloche, a poultry science student at the Auburn University, who won the award with her paper, “Validation of Prediction Equations for Apparent Metabolizable Energy of Corn Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles in Broiler Chicks.” Menconi received a trophy and a $500 cash prize.

Gut Health Management Begins with Good Bacteria at Hatchery

[ATLANTA] – Good or bad, bacteria are always present in the gastrointestinal tract of the bird. Some microorganisms can lead to disease, leaving poultry integrators with high treatment costs and losses in production; while other bacterial communities can be beneficial, colonizing the gut at the expense of pathogenic organisms. When it comes to a healthy flock, it’s the good bacteria and gut health that can make or break a successful poultry operation.

This is the approach global animal health leader Alltech has taken with their new Gut Health Management program, which uses the Seed, Feed, and Weed approach to support animal performance by promoting good bacteria, building natural defenses and maximizing growth and efficiency.

The Seed, Feed, and Weed program developed by Dr. Steve Collett, University of Georgia, is an alternative approach to gut heath that:

  • Seeds the gut with the right bacteria by introducing the proper microorganisms
  • Feeds the good bacteria and maintain a proper environment for them to survive
  • Weeds the unfavorable organisms before they colonize the intestinal tract

When paired with effective bio-security measures, this approach allows the animals to have the best chance for optimal productive performance, even without antibiotic growth promoters.

“As with people, ensuring a good start in life can have a major impact on the future health of young birds,” said Paulo Rigolin, global poultry director for Alltech. “This is why the first step of our program is to give young chicks and poults the right start by introducing the proper microbes in the hatchery.”

Many integrators find the main difficulty in upholding a successful gut health program is ensuring a proper bacterial balance through the life of the birds. Alltech’s program is a combination of feed technologies, technical support and analytical tools to confirm the correct intestinal environment is maintained from hatch to finish. One of the services included is True Check, a unique tool developed by Alltech that helps producers see how effective their feed is at providing nutrients for digestion. Utilizing samples of feed, True Check uses a system that replicates each section of the digestion process, and provides integrators with real diet performance and recommendations to help maximize nutrient release.

“With the right intestinal ecology, the villi will flourish and nutrient absorption will be maximized,” Rigolin said. “This program supports the company’s commitment to partner with integrators to make sure their flocks are performing at their maximum potential.”

 Alltech will officially launch the new Alltech Gut Health Management program to the poultry industry at the International Production and Processing Expo Jan. 27 - 29 in Atlanta, Georgia. For more information on the Alltech Gut Health Management program, producers can visit with an Alltech representative at the company’s booth #A1507.

Pigs Not Going to Market on Time? Examine Gut Health

[DES MOINES] – It’s a continuous race against time and money in the pig barn. Striving for the ultimate goal of getting pigs to market weight as quickly as possible; producers are also racing against the ever-growing cost that comes with each additional day the pigs are not sent to market. Poor gut health can delay marketing, adding further time to reach the desired finishing weight and money for the extra feed that must be purchased.

“Healthy pigs eat better and produce more efficiently. They are more likely to perform to their optimum potential,” said Russell Gilliam, U.S. swine business manager for Alltech. “Addressing gut health and managing it from wean to finish is important for the producer’s bottom line.”

The producer’s goal is that feed purchased is of optimum digestibility by the pig; the reality is that feed supplied and animal performance can vary greatly. Many challenges can affect gut health, from pH levels and feed quality to viruses and diseases. Gilliam said that while these obstacles can be difficult to manage, it is not impossible. Addressing the key phases of gut health, producers can increase the likelihood of their pigs reaching their maximum potential as quickly as possible.

“There are three key phases that we focus on with Alltech’s new Gut Health Management program,” Gilliam said. “The first is getting the animal off to the right start, because they can never get over a good or bad start. Second, it is essential that pigs are getting the most from their feed, ensuring the animals perform at their peak. Finally it is important to build the animal’s natural immunity to prepare it for any challenges that may arise.”

The company will officially launch Alltech Gut Health Management to the swine industry during the Iowa Pork Congress, Jan. 28 and 29 in Des Moines, Iowa. One of the services included in the second phase of the program is True CheckTM, a unique tool developed by Alltech that helps producers see how effective their feed is at providing nutrients for digestion. Utilizing samples of feed, True Check uses a system that mimics real life conditions of the pig’s digestive system. After simulation, samples are compared to show the energy and nutrient release, giving producers the results they can expect from their pigs’ diet. Using NIR (Near Infrared Spectrometer) capabilities, Alltech’s True Check in vitro screening has replicated more than 7,200 hours of pig digestion to date.

For more information on Alltech Gut Health Management, producers can stop at the company’s booth #413 or visit with an Alltech representative at the Producer’s Recognition Reception Wednesday, Jan. 28 from 4 to 6 p.m. in the CCCU Convention Center Grand Ballroom Pre-Function Area.

North America Harvest Analysis Determines Mycotoxins Stealing Ruminant Returns

The results are in and this year’s North America corn silage crop contains a mixture of molds and mycotoxins, putting beef and dairy cattle at high risk for mycotoxin exposure.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – The results are in and this year’s North America corn silage crop contains a mixture of molds and mycotoxins, putting beef and dairy cattle at high risk for mycotoxin exposure and performance problems including a 3.5 pound average loss in milk yield, according to a recent survey by Alltech.

A survey of 59 North American corn silage samples from across the United States and Canada from September to November 2014 tested for mycotoxin contamination through Alltech’s 37+TM mycotoxin analysis found an average 6.1 mycotoxins per sample. This year’s analysis took the information from the survey one step further, revealing the costs associated from mycotoxin contamination and what dairy and beef producers can save by utilizing Alltech Mycotoxin Management.

“Based on Alltech’s 37+ results of the 2014 harvest of corn silage, we see that the risk of mycotoxins to dairy cows is high. Scientific literature shows that at a similar risk level; cows may produce 3.5 pounds (1.6 L)/milk/day less when consuming mycotoxins,” said Dr. Alexandra Weaver, Alltech Mycotoxin Management Team. “Additionally, milk somatic cell count was shown to increase by 39 percent. With this loss of performance, the reduction in profitability per cow is an estimated decrease of $1.54/day.”

Weaver examined more than 90 peer-reviewed papers on the cost implications mycotoxins can have on animal production. An analysis is still underway on the costs associated with mycotoxicoses in beef cattle.

“Deductions in milk yield and rising SCC numbers may not be observable on a daily basis, but producers will notice the difference in production at the milk tank,” Weaver said. “By utilizing Alltech’s 37+ mycotoxin analysis and the Alltech MIKO program, we can better identify mold and mycotoxins present in grains and stored feedstuffs and pinpoint potential risks to production and economic returns.”

Many times it is not an acute case that can be readily identified, but a chronic situation associated with the ingestion of a low level of mycotoxins over an extended period of time. This results in a wide array of subclinical symptoms that slowly reduce performance, eat away at the producer’s bottom line and compromise animal health.

“While we boasted a record crop this year, quantity does not determine quality,” said Dr. Max Hawkins, nutritionist with Alltech’s Mycotoxin Management Team. “This year’s cool, wet weather delayed planting and harvesting and now that harvest is complete, we are dealing with storage and transportation issues that are putting the 2014 crop at additional risk for mycotoxin growth.”

Hawkins said while Midwest samples contained more mycotoxins with an average 6.7 per sample, East Coast and Canadian grains still should be a concern for cattle producers as Alltech’s Risk Equivalent Quantity (REQ) puts North America corn silage at a moderate to high risk level.  The REQ is an evaluation of the total toxicity of a given mycotoxin mixture based on the amount of individual mycotoxins in reference to Aflatoxin B1. The average REQ for this year’s corn silage is 276 for dairy and 220 for beef, putting both groups at high risk.

“Mycotoxins can impact the whole body. Even low levels of mycotoxins can impact performance and multiple mycotoxins increase that risk,” Hawkins said. “We must remember corn silage is only one ingredient in the ration; other feedstuffs can introduce additional mycotoxins.”

North America Harvest Analysis Determines Mycotoxins Stealing Poultry Profits

Results from Alltech’s 37+™ analysis show the North American corn crop contained an average 4.6 mycotoxins per sample, exhibiting a medium level risk equivalent quantity for broilers, layers and breeders.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – The results are in and this year’s North America corn crop contains a mixture of molds and mycotoxins, putting broilers and layers at risk for mycotoxin exposure and a 5 percent loss in average daily gain, according to a recent survey by Alltech.

A survey of 46 North American corn samples from across the United States and Canada from September to November 2014 tested for mycotoxin contamination through Alltech’s 37+™ mycotoxin analysis found an average 4.6 mycotoxins per sample. This year’s analysis took the information from the survey one step further, revealing the costs associated from mycotoxin contamination and what poultry producers can save by utilizing Alltech Mycotoxin Management.

“Based on Alltech’s 37+ results of the 2014 corn harvest, we see that the risk of mycotoxins to broilers is moderate. Scientific literature shows that at a similar risk level, broilers may have a 5.3 percent reduction in average daily gain when consuming mycotoxins,” said Dr. Alexandra Weaver, Alltech Mycotoxin Management Team. “Additionally, feed conversion rate (FCR) may increase by about 2.6 percent. With this loss of performance, the reduction in net return for broilers is an estimated decrease of $0.18 per bird.”

Weaver, who examined more than 90 peer-reviewed papers, said on average mycotoxins cost the broiler industry a 5.1 gram decrease in average daily gain per day and a 0.11 increase in FCR, resulting in a deficit of $0.34 per bird. For layers, Weaver calculates the average shortfall is 1.7 eggs lost per week, a 0.38 increase in FCR and an overall loss of $0.14 per hen per week.

“A 5 percent loss in average daily gain may not be observable on a daily basis, but producers will notice the difference in body weight and inefficiency in carcass processing at market,” Weaver said. “By utilizing Alltech’s 37+ mycotoxin analysis and the Alltech MIKO program, we can better identify mold and mycotoxins present in grains and stored feedstuffs and pinpoint potential risks to production and economic returns.”

Many times it is not an acute case that can be readily identified, but a chronic situation associated with the ingestion of a low level of mycotoxins over an extended period of time. This results in a wide array of subclinical symptoms that slowly reduce performance, eat away at the producer’s bottom line and compromise animal health.

 “While we boasted a record crop this year, quantity does not determine quality,” said Dr. Max Hawkins, nutritionist with Alltech’s Mycotoxin Management Team. “This year’s cool, wet weather delayed planting and harvesting and now that harvest is complete, we are dealing with storage and transportation issues that are putting the 2014 crop at additional risk for mycotoxin growth.”

Hawkins said while East Coast samples contained more mycotoxins with an average 5.7 per sample, Midwest and Canadian grains still should be a concern for poultry producers as Alltech’s Risk Equivalent Quantity (REQ) puts North America corn at a moderate to high risk level.  The REQ is an evaluation of the total toxicity of a given mycotoxin mixture based on the amount of individual mycotoxins in reference to Aflatoxin B1. For broilers, the average REQ for this year’s corn crop is 77, putting the poultry sector at a higher risk.

“Mycotoxins can impact the whole body. Even low levels of mycotoxins can impact performance and multiple mycotoxins increase that risk,” Hawkins said. “We must remember corn is only one ingredient in the ration; other feedstuffs can introduce additional mycotoxins.”

North America Harvest Analysis Determines Mycotoxins Stealing Pig Profits

Results from Alltech’s 37+™ analysis show the North American corn crop contained an average 4.6 mycotoxins per sample, exhibiting a high level risk equivalent quantity for sows, nursery and finishing pigs.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – The results are in and this year’s North America corn crop contains a mixture of molds and mycotoxins, putting nursery, sow and finishing pigs at risk for mycotoxin exposure and a 6 percent loss in average daily gain, according to a recent survey by Alltech.

A survey of 46 North American corn samples from across the United States and Canada from September to November 2014 tested for mycotoxin contamination through Alltech’s 37+™ mycotoxin analysis found an average 4.6 mycotoxins per sample. This year’s analysis took the information from the survey one step further, revealing the costs associated from mycotoxin contamination and what pork producers can save by utilizing Alltech Mycotoxin Management.

“Based on Alltech’s 37+ results of the 2014 corn harvest, we see that the risk of mycotoxins to pigs is high. Scientific literature shows that at a similar risk level, nursery pigs may have a 6.3 percent reduction in average daily gain when consuming mycotoxins,” said Dr. Alexandra Weaver, Alltech Mycotoxin Management Team. “Additionally, feed conversion rate may be increase by about 4 percent. With this loss of performance, the reduction in net return per nursery pig is an estimated decrease of $4.21.”

Weaver, who examined more than 90 peer-reviewed papers, said mycotoxins on average cost nursery pig producers an 81 gram decrease in average daily gain, a 0.13 increase in feed conversion rate (FCR) and a loss of $7.42 per pig. From the trial analysis, Weaver concluded finishing hogs on average experience a 143 gram decrease in average daily gain and a 0.96 increase in FCR, resulting in a shortfall of $5.79 per pig. Sows affected by mycotoxin exposure lose an average 1.13 piglets per farrowing and 4.23 percent more are born dead. Weaver calculates mycotoxins cost sow producers $21.79 per litter.

“A 6 percent loss in average daily gain may not be observable on a daily basis, but producers will notice the different in body weight and increased days to market,” Weaver said. “By utilizing Alltech’s 37+ mycotoxin analysis and the Alltech MIKO program, we can better identify mold and mycotoxins present in grains and stored feedstuffs and pinpoint potential risks to production and economic returns.”

Many times it is not an acute case that can be readily identified, but a chronic situation associated with the ingestion of a low level of mycotoxins over an extended period of time. This results in a wide array of subclinical symptoms that slowly reduce performance, eat away at the producer’s bottom line and compromise animal health.

“While we boasted a record crop this year, quantity does not determine quality,” said Dr. Max Hawkins, nutritionist with Alltech’s Mycotoxin Management Team. “This year’s cool, wet weather delayed planting and harvesting and now that harvest is complete, we are dealing with storage and transportation issues that are putting the 2014 crop at additional risk for mycotoxin growth.”

Hawkins said while East Coast samples contained more mycotoxins with an average 5.7 per sample, Midwest and Canadian grains still should be a concern for the swine industry as Alltech’s Risk Equivalent Quantity (REQ) puts North America corn at a moderate to high risk level.  The REQ is an evaluation of the total toxicity of a given mycotoxin mixture based on the amount of individual mycotoxins in reference to Aflatoxin B1. For nursery pigs, this year’s corn crop poses a high risk REQ for Type B Trichothecenes.

 “Mycotoxins can impact the whole body. Even low levels of mycotoxins can impact performance and multiple mycotoxins increase that risk,” Hawkins said. “We must remember corn is only one ingredient in the ration; other feedstuffs can introduce additional mycotoxins.”

  • Alltech REBELation

    A celebration of all things entrepreneurship, business and marketing, and the role of science and agriculture: Mark your calendars for May 16-20 in Lexington, Kentucky, for Alltech REBELation.

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