North America



Alltech REBELation kicks off with Medal of Excellence award to Gen. Colin Powell

Nearly 3,000 people from 63 countries are in attendance at the Alltech REBELation, which is being held in the famed Rupp Arena in downtown Lexington, Ky., USA. It is Alltech’s 31st annual symposium.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell addressed a packed audience Monday in Rupp Arena at the opening session of the Alltech REBELation, an international conference exploring innovation, inspiration and world-changing ideas that continues through Wednesday.

It was the first time the event’s plenary sessions were held in the famed Rupp Arena, a venue large enough to accommodate the nearly 3,000 attendees from 63 countries.

In the spirit of the company’s 31st annual conference, Alltech president and founder Dr. Pearse Lyons introduced Powell as “America’s favorite rebel.” Celebrated for his steady hand at the helm of the ship of state, Powell is high on the list of most admired leaders in the United States in the past 20 years, said Lyons.

“Be a rebel like Gen. Powell. That’s what you’re here for,” Lyons told the crowd, inviting them to “do things differently,” a fundamental to both leadership and innovation.

A four-star general who served four U.S. presidents in various roles, including national security advisor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the United States’ 65th secretary of state, Powell shared his insights on leadership with attendees.

Powell underscored that “leaders need to set a purpose. The best leaders convey purpose to everyone in their organization.” He said he often advises young people to “be a success every day; give your best every day. That will bring you satisfaction.”

Posing the question “How do you know you’re a good leader?” Powell responded: “If your troops follow you, even if only out of curiosity.” Noting that he never once voiced the military cliché, “That’s an order!” Powell added, “You constantly have to work on building bonds of trust within the organization.”

The military maxim “Make sure you take care of the troops” translates in the business realm, said Powell. “Make sure you are giving your people everything they need to get the job done.”

As Lyons observed, “The number one thing missing from agriculture and business today is leadership. And when I think of leadership, General Powell comes first to mind. He is decisive, courageous and a force multiplier of perpetual optimism. For inspirational leadership, we need not look any further than General Powell, and, for this reason, he is the ideal recipient of our 2015 Medal of Excellence.”

The Medal of Excellence is Alltech’s highest distinction, awarded annually to someone of great achievement and character. Previous honorees include scientists such as Dr. Eugenia Wang for her pioneering work in microRNA and agricultural leaders such as Norman Borlaug, the “father of the Green Revolution.”

REBELation’s all-star line-up includes more than 110 speakers such as Jim Stengel, former global marketing officer for Procter & Gamble, who also spoke Monday. Tuesday’s speakers will be Walter Robb, co-CEO of Whole Foods Market, and Raymond McCauley, chair of the biotech track at Singularity University, a Silicon Valley think tank.

REBELation wraps up Wednesday with an address by University of Kentucky head basketball coach John Calipari, who will receive the Alltech Humanitarian Award.

Clips from Powell and Stengel’s presentations, along with a host of media resources, are available at rebel.alltech.com. Follow the conversation on Twitter with #REBELation.

The Dayton Beer Company wins Alltech Commonwealth Cup with a golden strong ale at the Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest

John Wiley of The Dayton Beer Company accepted the Alltech Commonwealth Cup on Saturday, May 16 on behalf of brewer Pete Hilgeman of The Dayton Beer Company. The brewery’s “Batch 100” golden strong ale took the top prize. Winners were chosen by an expert panel of judges based on blind judging of appearance, aroma, flavor, body, style and quality.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – It’s a huge day for the owner of The Dayton Beer Company – not only is he getting married at his new brewery today, but his “Batch 100” golden strong ale was also chosen from over 350 beers to win the Alltech Commonwealth Cup. The competition is the only professional beer competition in Kentucky and boasted 350 beers from 20 countries and five continents competing for the title.

The top award was announced at the Alltech Craft Brews and Food Fest Saturday in Lexington, an event that in its second year, drew 51 national and local craft breweries to nearly 50,000 square feet in Heritage Hall, double the size of last year’s space. 180 brews were sampled by thirsty patrons, with special tappings every 15 minutes that kept the excitement level high. Kentucky craft distillers from across the state were pouring samples, for those looking for a bourbon, rye, brandy or even absinthe fix. Food vendors dispensed samples and meals as many patrons stayed and socialized, and debated which brew or cider to sample next from breweries across the country as local bands played onstage.

Batch 100 from The Dayton Beer Company of Dayton, Ohio, is a Belgian-style ale filtered and tank conditioned and made with candy sugar. The judges noted its subtle malty sweetness, pleasant dry finish, high carbonation, and nice hop quality. The small brewery is headed by Pete Hilgeman, the groom getting married today. Brewery representative John Wiley travelled from Dayton, Ohio to accept the award.  The brewery won eight medals last year in the competition, and won another five this year. The brewery is “proud to be the first true microbrewery in the Dayton area in over 50 years and describes its beer as “hand-crafted with no automation in small batches.”

Other entrants received gold, silver and bronze medals for quality brews. Lexington’s Blue Stallion Brewing Co. won four silver medals and five bronzes. Country Boy Brewing Co. of Lexington was awarded one silver medal and two bronzes. The brewery winner last year, Zip’s Brewhouse of Hungary, also picked up several medals for its brews.

Winners were chosen by an expert panel of judges based on blind judging of appearance, aroma, flavor, body, style and quality.

Join the conversation on Twitter about the Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest using @alltechbrews and the hashtag #AlltechBrews, or on Facebook at facebook.com/alltechbrewsandfood.

Don’t let the summer heat spoil your herd’s milking potential

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – With milk prices on a downward slope this spring, it’s more important than ever not to dump money down the drain this summer.

Keeping cattle healthy and protected from the threat of mastitis can be extremely difficult, especially during the summer months.  Heat, humidity and other factors can make managing the potential for pathogenic bacteria even more difficult. Poor practices that might be tolerated during cooler parts of the year hold minimal to no forgiveness during the warmer months.

Roger Scaletti, one of Alltech’s dairy experts in milk quality, provides five areas that can keep dairy herds on the right path for peak productivity and assist in preventing instances of mastitis:

  1. Parlor routine can be very often overlooked, as simply getting cows milked two to three times a day can be a feat in itself.  Wearing gloves, making sure there is adequate predip coverage and keeping in mind the contact time of predip before it is wiped off can have a significant impact.  Milking clean, dry teats is the name of the game, and all employees should be working toward that common goal.
  2. The environment cattle are housed in can also be a factor that can play a role in poor milk quality.  Are cows housed in a mastitis infection yard, or are they in a well ventilated, dry area, with minimal contact to some of the key mastitis-causing bacteria? 
  3. When purchasing cattle, what kind of screening takes place before allowing these animals into your herd?  Assessing milk culture and production records, as well as quarantining the animals before allowing them the ability to infect your entire herd, can help to minimize instances of introducing a new infection to your herd. 
  4. Teat end health is critical when it comes to avoiding mastitis causing bacteria.  Milking equipment should be serviced routinely, as equipment not performing properly can cause teat end problems.  Using a five- point scoring system can help to analyze the condition of teat ends, as well as ensuring that the bacteria-blocking keratin plug is able to fulfill its responsibilities.  Teat ends should maintain a smooth structure, avoiding any lesions or fraying, as these rough surfaces can more easily allow bacteria to enter the gland.
  5. Nutrition and the use of organic trace minerals can also play a key role in milk quality and a huge part in managing infections before they even occur.  Manganese and zinc have shown to help herds maintain a low somatic cell and bacteria count. Copper supplementation is effective in reducing the severity of an already commenced infection and returning the animal more quickly to normal. Organic selenium acts on a cellular level increasing the defense efficiency of immune cells even in non-immunocompromised animals, positively impacting ongoing infections and helping to prevent new ones. Recent field research shows that producers can feed substantially lower amounts of organic trace minerals than the inorganic alternative and get a similar, if not better, performance in dairy cows.

This year, Alltech has continued their Milk Quality and Udder Health workshop series across North America, with recent stops held in New York and Vermont as well as at Alltech’s Alexandria mineral plant in Ontario, Canada. The workshop includes informative presentations, guided plant tours and an udder dissection demonstration as well as the latest information on technologies to improve herd health, milk production and quality while reducing environmental impact. The workshops have also been held in Latin America and Europe.

For more information on the Alltech Mineral Management program or to get more information on the workshops, please contact KnowYourMinerals@alltech.com.

Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest this Saturday to feature 180 craft brews, craft distillers and food vendors

Alltech is hosting the second annual Alltech Craft Brews and Food Fest at the Lexington Convention Center in downtown Lexington, Ky. on Saturday, May 16 from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. The region’s largest craft beer and food festival will give attendees the opportunity to sample 180 beers brewed by 51 breweries from across the United States. Tickets can be purchased online for $30 until Friday, May 15 at midnight, EDT. Tickets can be purchased at the door for $35.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – Grab your sampling glass and get ready – 180 beers brewed by 51 breweries from across the nation will be on tap at the Alltech Craft Brews and Food Fest this Saturday, May 16, from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Lexington Center’s Heritage Hall. The beerfest is one of the largest in the region and is even doubling its floor space this year, boasting local food, craft distillers, live entertainment and sensory sessions. The Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest will serve as one of the culminating events for the third Annual Lexington Craft Beer Week May 9-17, a celebration of Lexington’s craft beer culture.

The day will kick off early for go-getters with the inaugural Horse Capital Marathon and Half-Marathon, the only marathon in the state of Kentucky. Alltech just signed on as the title sponsor of the race, which starts at Fasig-Tipton thoroughbred auction firm in Lexington and winds its way through horse country. It is the first full sanctioned marathon in Lexington since 1980 and a Boston Marathon qualifying event. Kentucky Ale® brews will be served at the finish line.

The fun continues at the Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest downtown, with a total of 52 special tappings occurring every 15 minutes from each brewery for specialty and collaboration brews, including brews such as Country Boy Brewing’s Warehouse Experiment 3, Sweetwater Brewing Company’s 18th Anniversary Cork and Cage Belgian Tripel, and a barrel-aged collaboration between Dogfish Head Brewing Co. and Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. A full list of special tappings is available at http://us.alltechbrewsandfood.com/breweries.

Rare brews, including some not yet distributed in Kentucky, like Tampa’s Cigar City Brewing and Cigar City Cider & Mead, will also be on tap – including the company’s highly regarded Jai Alai IPA and Cowboy Dan’s Holiday Extravaganza, a cider that tastes like caramel apples.

Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. will feature multiple rare brews from the brewers’ warehouse including a limited edition Kentucky Kölsch aged in apple brandy barrels; Kentucky Blue Ale, a Belgian ale accented with blueberries; and Kentucky Honey Barrel Brown Ale, a popular past winter seasonal. The brewery’s new summer seasonal, Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale, modeled after an Old Fashioned bourbon cocktail, will also be on tap.

For the first time, the festival will also include craft distillers from across Kentucky, including Limestone Branch Distillery, Lebanon; Barrel House Distillery, Lexington; Copper and Kings, Louisville; Willett Distillery,  Bardstown; The Gentleman Distillery, Paris; and Town Branch Distillery, Lexington. Distillers will offer spirits samples for tasting.

Onsite food vendors offering samples and meals for purchase include Claw Daddy’s, The Village Idiot, Enoteca, JDI, Noodles & Co., The Cheezy Mac, Dupree Catering, Popcorn Paradise, COVAP Ham and The Sweet Spot.

Keeping the environment lively throughout the day will be a range of live music from The Bohannons, Willie Eames, Patrick McNeese Band, Josh Nolan, and The Marble Creek Rangers.

The recipient of the Alltech Commonwealth Cup, will be announced at the festival, and staff from the Alltech Brewing & Distilling Academy will be onsite offering sensory sessions. The Alltech Commonwealth Cup, now in its second year, is the only professional craft beer competition in Kentucky and is open to both local and global entrants.

The Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest serves as a kickoff for the Alltech REBELation, an international event exploring innovation, inspiration and world-changing ideas in Lexington, Ky., USA, from May 17-20. The conference features a Brewing and Distilling symposium, which begins on May 18 and will feature Sam Calagione of Dogfish Head Brewery, Greg Koch of Stone Brewing Co. and Bill Samuels, Jr. of Maker’s Mark. Registration is open to the public and available at rebel.alltech.com.

Brewfest tickets can be purchased online for $30 until Friday, May 15 at midnight, EDT or can be purchased at the door for $35. All tickets include 20 beer samples, three food samples, a commemorative glass and free entertainment.  Designated driver tickets without beer sampling privileges will be available online and at the door for $10. Attendees must be 21 to enter.

Join the conversation on Twitter about the Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest using @alltechbrews and the hashtag #AlltechBrews, or on Facebook at facebook.com/alltechbrewsandfood.

2015 Alltech mycotoxin storage analysis: The only constant is change

According to Alltech’s recent storage myctoxin analysis, the Risk Equivalent Quantity (REQ) for mycotoxins in corn silage decreased from September through December; however REQ has steadily increased since February and could be due to oxygen exposure and face management.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] –  Dairy and beef producers should keep a watchful eye over the remaining 2014 crop in their bins as both corn silage and total mixed rations (TMR) are now trending at high risk for mycotoxin contamination, according to Alltech’s recent storage analysis.

“Producers often ask how this is possible once the forage has been fermented. Mycotoxins are produced by soil-born molds and these not only infest the plant but are also brought into the storage facility with the harvested crop,” said Dr. Max Hawkins, a nutritionist with Alltech’s Mycotoxin Management Team. “Just as in the field, if the environmental factors are in place for the molds to flourish, they will; and if crops are stressed, they can produce a mycotoxin. Factors that affect mycotoxin production in fermented forages are plant stress prior to harvest, packing density, moisture, oxygen exposure and face management.”

Through Alltech’s Analytical Services Laboratory, the company’s 37+® mycotoxin analysis program evaluates the change in mycotoxin numbers and levels over time from harvest throughout storage. By analyzing the number and levels of mycotoxins present, the program can provide a Risk Equivalent Quantity (REQ) of the increase in risk from harvest to feed out.

The REQ for harvest through December was reported at 244, a high risk for dairy cows. According to Hawkins, the main mycotoxins present during testing were Type B Trichothecenes and Fusaric Acid and together these can have a synergistic effect, impacting dry matter intake, milk production, gut health and immune response.

Through Alltech’s recent storage analysis, the average 2015 sample has an REQ at 146, keeping the risk level at high alert. Type B Trichothecenes is still the main culprit; however the analysis showed less Fusaric Acid present than the earlier test.

“When looking at the timeline for the REQ for corn silage you can see a definite decrease from September through December but then a distinct increase from December to present,” Hawkins said. “It appears that once the corn silage was opened up in the bins for feeding, REQ has steadily increased. This could be due to oxygen exposure and face management, but the REQ is over high risk and should be closely monitored moving forward.”

The average TMR samples from September 2014 through April 2015 were at moderate risk but the trend since February 2015 has demonstrated a much higher REQ risk to cow health and performance. Beef TMR REQ has especially been trending higher in recent months.

Hawkins said both TMR and corn silage toxin trends are consistent with past analyses. Corn silage is at a particular high level alert, due to rising levels of Type B and A Trichothecenes and Fusaric Acid. These mycotoxins warrant monitoring as corn silage is exposed to more elements over time. TMR REQ is also expected to continue to rise, due in major part to corn silage inclusion.

“As I have been telling our customers, the only constant is change. During the spring and summer, stored fermented forages and high moisture grains are susceptible to dry matter and nutrient loss,” Hawkins said. “These factors can contribute to decreased feed efficiency, performance and profitability.”

Five ways to keep your pigs from sizzling this summer

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – The heat is almost on. If the Old Farmer’s Almanac maintains its 80 percent accuracy rating, summer 2015 will be hot and dry. What can pig producers do now to prepare their barn?

Heat can cause significant stress for pigs, often causing agitation and affecting their eating habits. When pigs eat less, they convert less feed into muscle thus reducing their average daily gain, increasing their days to market and ultimately putting a damper on the producer’s pocket book. Stress also opens doors to many other possibilities such as health challenges.

“You have to take into account the heat outside in addition to the heat that the pigs are producing from eating and moving around in the barn. Respiratory rates begin to increase around 70 degrees Fahrenheit, and with high humidity, it becomes difficult for pigs to find relief from the heat on their own,” said Russell Gilliam, U.S. swine business manager for Alltech.

Pigs cannot cool themselves off as well as other animals, thus making it more important to ensure their environment is as comfortable as possible. Gilliam suggests five key management areas for beating the heat this summer:  

  1. Control the temperature. This is especially important in early and late summer as wide variations between night and day temperatures can compound stress levels that the animals are experiencing. Avoid temperature shifts of a few degrees or more. Monitoring equipment such as computers, sensors and thermometers are essential.
     
  2. Increase ventilation and ensure adequate space. Since pigs can generate large amounts of heat, focus on practices that produce less. Ensure each pig has enough space and ventilation. Keep motion minimal and do not disturb the animals during peak temperature times of the day. Check all fans and vents to ensure they are clean and running properly. A worn-out fan, bearings or wiring can have dramatic consequences in the summer.
     
  3. Focus on water quality and access. It is very important to make sure pigs have unlimited access to fresh and cool drinking water, as drinking levels can also have an effect on feed intake. Taking water samples at the beginning and end of the water lines can help confirm water is the best quality possible.
     
  4. Power your nutrition program. Data has shown that offering pigs a combination of organic acids, electrolytes, enzymes and probiotics can support young animals during times of stress. Organic acids support probiotic growth in the gut and enzymes can help enhance intake and digestibility. Electrolytes make sure the animal stays hydrated, especially in times of heat stress. Combination technologies work quickly by lowering the pH of the water. Depending on the type of water and the target level for pH, these technologies can work on their own or with a combination of other ingredients to help optimize the gut environment.

    In a related study, Alltech’s Acid-Pak 4-Way 2X® was administered through drinking water for the entire nursery period as part of Alltech’s Gut Health Management program (FRIO, A.J.L., YU, E., AND R. SANTOS; 2009). In terms of overall performance, the investigators found the combination of acidifiers maintained optimum conditions for the pigs to maintain electrolyte balance and pH levels.
     
  5. Monitor your pigs. Even if you think it might not be too hot, pigs can still be affected by the additional heat they are creating. Watch for signs that your pigs are overheating: faster breathing, fluctuations in feed and water intake levels, reduced activity and lying stretched on the floor, often separated from others.

“Being prepared for heat stress challenges can lead to healthier animals and healthier profits. Addressing the summer challenges that arise as quickly as possible can have a major impact on the overall value of your pigs when you take them to market,” Gilliam said. “To keep your animals prepared, it is essential you keep their nutrition equipped with technologies that build their natural immunity.”

For more information on protecting pigs this summer from the heat, visit the Alltech booth #217 at the 2015 World Pork Expo.

2015 Forrest Bassford Student Award down to final four

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – Four agricultural journalism students will move on to the next level in the 2015 Forrest Bassford Student Award competition at Ag Media Summit in Scottsdale, Ariz., July 25- 29.

The Livestock Publication Council (LPC) recently announced the four finalists that will be rewarded for their talent with the 2015 Forrest Bassford Student Travel Award. The award, sponsored by Alltech, supports the journalists’ travel fees and participation at the Livestock Publication Council annual convention and Ag Media Summit, where they will have the chance to interact with more than 500 livestock publication personnel, attend agri-journalism workshops and seminars, and compete for the 2015 Forrest Bassford Student Award.

The Forrest Bassford Student Award is designed to help some of the top prospects in the livestock publications industry to grow in their success,” said LPC Student Award Committee Chairperson Scarlett Hagins. “We hope this opportunity will aid these four students in finding a path to their bright futures in agricultural journalism.”

The four successful applicants are:

  • Kendall Herren, Urbana, Illinois: Herren will be a senior at the University of Illinois this fall and is majoring in agricultural communications.
  • Kaitlin Morgan, Manhattan, Kansas: A senior at Kansas State, Morgan is majoring in animal sciences and industry/agricultural communications and journalism.
  • Jamie Keyes, Logan, Utah: Keyes is pursuing a degree in agricultural communication and journalism at Utah State University where she will be enrolled as a senior this fall.
  • Nicole Lane, Manhattan, Kansas: Lane will be a senior at Kansas State University for the fall semester and is majoring in agricultural communications and journalism.

During the Ag Media Summit, the travel award winners will go through an interview and portfolio review. The Forrest Bassford Student Award winner will receive a $2,000 scholarship while the other three candidates will each receive $750 travel scholarships to attend the convention.

2015 marks the 30th year for the Student Award Program. Forrest Bassford's name was appended to the LPC Student Award in 1992 in honor of his contribution to LPC, and his particular interest in furthering the Student Award. Alltech has co-sponsored the award since 2012.

“We need strong, vibrant journalists investigating and sharing agriculture’s greatest stories. We are proud to encourage and support these talented young messengers from across the United States as they further their studies in agricultural journalism,” said Ann Hess, North America field PR manager for Alltech.

Alltech to award Gen. Colin Powell with Medal of Excellence

On Monday, May 18, Alltech will present General Colin Powell with the 2015 Medal of Excellence, the highest honor awarded annually by Alltech. Powell will be sharing his insights on leadership with the international attendees at the official opening session of the Alltech REBELation conference in Lexington, Kentucky, USA.

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – General Colin Powell will receive the Alltech Medal of Excellence during the Alltech REBELation, a conference exploring innovation, inspiration and world-changing ideas in Lexington, Ky., May 17-20. The Medal of Excellence is Alltech’s highest distinction, awarded annually to someone of great achievement and character. Previous honorees include scientists such as Dr. Eugenia Wang for her pioneering work in microRNA and agricultural leaders such as Norman Borlaug, the “father of the Green Revolution.”

A four-star general who served four U.S. presidents in various roles, including national security advisor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the United States’ 65th secretary of state, Colin Powell is a strategist, diplomat and leader. On Monday, May 18, Powell will be sharing his insights on leadership with the international attendees at the official opening session of the Alltech REBELation.

“What is the number one thing missing from agriculture and business today? Leadership, and when I think of leadership, General Powell comes first to mind,” said Dr. Pearse Lyons, president and founder of Alltech. “He is decisive, courageous and a ‘force multiplier of perpetual optimism.’ He broke down barriers as the first African-American chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and brought stability to tumultuous situations through his ability to build trust and develop alliances. For inspirational leadership, we need not look any further than General Powell, and, for this reason, he is the ideal recipient of our 2015 Medal of Excellence.”

The son of Jamaican immigrants, Powell grew up in South Bronx, New York, earned a bachelor’s degree in geology and then dedicated 35 years of service to the U.S. Army. After serving as President Ronald Reagan’s national security advisor, Powell became the youngest officer, first Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) graduate and first African-American to be the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for both President George H.W. Bush and President Bill Clinton. Under President George W. Bush, he was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate to hold the position of secretary of state.

The highly respected general has been the recipient of numerous U.S. military awards and decorations, as well as civil awards, including two Presidential Medals of Freedom. He has also been recognized with awards, including a French Legion of Honor and an honorary knighthood (Great Britain), from more than 24 countries.

Several boards and organizations continue to benefit from his leadership, including the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at the City College of New York; America’s Promise Alliance for children; Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm; Bloom Energy, an alternative energy company utilizing fuel cell technology; Salesforce.com, the world’s largest provider of Cloud-based customer relationship management software; the Council on Foreign Relations; the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial; the Vietnam Veterans Memorial; and the Smithsonian Institute’s African American Museum of History and Culture.

He is the author of two bestselling books. “My American Journey” has been published in more than a dozen languages, and “It Worked for Me” was an instant New York Times bestseller. He and his wife, Alma Vivian Johnson, have three children and four grandchildren.

Registration for the Alltech REBELation is open now. For more information, or to request an invitation, contact a local Alltech representative, visit rebel.alltech.com or email rebelation@alltech.com. Join the conversation on Twitter with #REBELation.

An iconic cocktail reinvented: Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale summer seasonal beer debuts

A limited summertime release from Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. puts a new twist on the Southern favorite, with Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale. The subtly sweet, citrusy ale is brewed with orange peel, then aged in fresh bourbon barrels and bitters barrels with tart cherry. It hits store shelves this week in Kentucky, and will reach select markets in the company’s domestic distribution area soon. At 10 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), the limited seasonal release has a suggested retail price

[LEXINGTON, Ky.] – Cocktails are back in a big way, and now there’s a new way to enjoy the most iconic of them all – the Old Fashioned. A limited summertime beer release from Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. puts a new twist on the Southern favorite, with Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale. Ideal for fast-approaching Derby parties or late summer evenings on the patio, the cocktail-inspired brew will conjure up the sights and sounds of bartenders in starched shirts and white jackets, ragtime and the unmistakable clink of ice in a rocks glass.

Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale is a subtly sweet, citrusy ale brewed with orange peel, then aged with tart cherry in fresh bourbon barrels and bitters barrels. It debuts this week in local markets, and will soon reach other domestic territories in limited supplies.

The Old Fashioned cocktail is said to have originated in Louisville, Kentucky in the late 1800s, at a private club called the Pendennis Club, in honor of Colonel James E. Pepper. Pepper was a prominent bourbon distiller in Lexington, Ky. whose thoroughbreds raced in the Kentucky Derby.

Though bartenders still debate the best way to make and garnish the drink, the Old Fashioned is a cocktail traditionally made by muddling sugar with bitters, adding bourbon, and sometimes also muddling or garnishing with cherries and orange.

 “Cocktails are big right now,” said Ken Lee, master brewer for Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. “The cocktail culture has definitely seen a resurgence in recent years, and we wanted to salute a cocktail that is beloved here in Kentucky, the Old Fashioned. Making a beer inspired by the cocktail was both a lot of fun and a challenge for us to make. We even used bitters as well as bourbon barrels for the aging process. We figured what better brewery to make a beer like this than one that also produces its own bourbon and is known for its barrel aging?”

At 10 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale seasonal release has a suggested retail price of $14.99 for a four-pack. The brew will also be on tap at the upcoming Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fest Saturday, May 16 in Heritage Hall at the Lexington Center in downtown Lexington. Advance tickets are on sale for $30 at Eventbrite.com.

Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Company’s barrel-aged seasonal program allows the brewery to brew unique beers outside of its year-round offerings to experiment with new tastes and ways of barrel aging. The brewery regularly ages 3,000 to 5,000 barrels at a time, and handles up to 1,000 barrels per week.

Please follow the Kentucky Ale Facebook page or the Kentucky Ale Twitter for updates on Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale availability across the region as shipments are made.

Webinar alert: Spring storage concerns for dairy and beef feed

WHAT: Join Dr. Max Hawkins, nutritionist, Alltech Mycotoxin Management Team, as he presents the latest information on the rising mycotoxin levels found in North America stored corn silage and TMR samples and the increased risk it presents to dairy and beef cattle.

WHEN: Friday, May 8, 2015

12 p.m. EDT

WHERE: To reserve a spot for the webinar: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7085938291188564737

MORE: A survey of 59 North American corn silage samples from across the United States and Canada from September to November 2014 tested for mycotoxin contamination through Alltech’s 37+® mycotoxin analysis found an average 6.1 mycotoxins per sample. Based at the Analytical Services Laboratory of Alltech in Winchester, Kentucky, and utilizing LC/MS/MS technology, Alltech’s state of the art 37+ analytical method is the most advanced mycotoxin analysis available.

The 37+ survey sets the baseline for forage quality when producers start feeding the 2014 crop. The crop condition at harvest and the storage environment (temperature, oxygen, moisture) determine if these levels will rise during storage and increase the risk to cows.

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